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Rios_Linen_1 audknits

Rios Linen – Carrying the Yarn

Book, Patterns, Yarn , June 7, 2016

Even after making it a bunch of times, I’m still obsessed with the linen stitch scarf pattern I included in my book Reversible Scarves: Curing the Wrong Side Blues. I turn to it over and over when I travel because it’s a super-portable project and is easily memorized.

Rios_Linen_Alt_Yarn_4

I love using it to experiment with my favorite variegated yarns. On airplanes, I am happy to knit the simple pattern, admire new colors as the appear on my needles, and listen to my favorite podcasts. For this scarf, I used Malabrigo Rios in the “Diana” colorway.

Rios_Linen_Alt_Yarn_2

Both the front and back textures are lovely, and really show off the beautiful colors.

Rios_Linen_1

Some hand-dyed yarns are wildly different in color from one skein to the other, even when dyed at the same time. Take these two balls of Rios in the Diana colorway, for instance:

Rios_Linen_Alt_Yarn_3-2

If I were to work the scarf until one skein ran out and then start the second skein, my scarf would end up with two distinctly different colors. For the scarf above I carried two very different skeins of “Diana” up the length of the scarf. I worked one skein for 2 or 4 rows, then alternated the other skein for 2 or 4 rows, resulting in a nice blending of the two.

I think I’ll do the next scarf with 2 skeins of Diana and change skeins every 3 inches or so and see if it makes a striped effect that I like.
Experiment on!

Comments (02)

  1. When I only crocheted I tried this method of blending yarns, but it seldom worked well because of the stitch height. When I learned to knit, I was able to use yarns this way with great results.

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