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Giveaway: Free Spirit Knits

May 14

A couple of weeks ago I reviewed the beautiful book, Free Spirit Knits: 20 Knitted Garments and Accessories Inspired by the Southwest. I’m thrilled to be able to give away a copy of this book. There are many lovely patterns to make, including some great sweaters for guys.

Free Spitit Knits Cover

Let’s celebrate Memorial Day by leaving this drawing open until midnight Eastern Time on Monday, May 30th. To enter the random drawing, simply leave a comment here on this post. Please include your contact information in your comment so I can let you know if you’re the winner. (One comment per person, please, with only one comment and email address per person.)

I can mail this book anywhere in the world as long as there are no postal or delivery restrictions.

Many thanks to Interweave Knits for making this giveaway possible.

Publisher Info:

Free Spirit Knits: 20 Knitted Garments and Accessories Inspired by the Southwest

By Anne Podlesak

Interweave/F+W; $25.99

144 pages

New Lace Knitting Giveaway Winner

February 23

Congratulations to Amanda in Merrill, Oregon, for winning the drawing for Romi Hill’s fantastic book, New Lace Knitting.

New Lace Knitting cover

I love this book and will have my copy on my shelf for years to come. The designs are lovely and the patterns are very well written. There are quite a few patterns I know I’ll want to make in the future.  Congratulations, Romi, for writing a treasure!

See You In 2016

December 20

I hope everyone has a wonderful time with family and friends over the holidays.

See you next year!


posted under Uncategorized | 1 Comment »

Thanksgiving 2015

November 21

Happy Thanksgiving


Where’d She Go???

June 6

I did not fall off the face of the earth, but the past few months have been full of crazy twists and turns. I’m sorry I haven’t posted since… yikes, could it really have been since March? Oh my. I’ll try to make it up to you.

I was unbelievably lucky to spend April designing a little something that’ll appear in a magazine in the fall. Being the Slowest Designer and Slowest Knitter on the planet, it took longer than any reasonable person would have thought. Oh yeah, that’s also when we started to pack up our house in anticipation of putting it on the market.

Yes, my 35-year love affair with California has come to an end. I will miss it terribly. I already yearn for my friends and my LYS and the incredible scenery.

So, the months have been filled with packing boxes (how on earth did we accumulate that much stuff?). To my dismay, I couldn’t de-stash fast enough for my poor husband to finally see the true vastness of my yarn “collection”. Oh, and the cake pans. I never could explain to his satisfaction why one family needs a half dozen Bundt pans plus a pile of antique aspic molds. (Because they’re cute I say.)

I try to even the score by bringing up the golf club “collection”, but it’s a pretty pathetic ruse.

We are on to our next adventure. We just aren’t sure yet where that will be!



March 20

Why is it I’m always a season behind in my knitting? Ah well, there’s just enough winter-ish snow for this lovely, warm sweater to be useful for another week or so. “Mork” is designed by Julia Farwell-Clay. I love patterns that are both relaxing to knit and also interesting. Worked in worsted weight, the knitting progressed quickly, while the cables kept my interest.

Knitting Mork sweater

Even the back is filled beautifully with cabling and a just-right icord edge.

Mork Back 2-2

I used Rowan Pure Wool Worsted for this project. I was worried it might be a bit scratchy, but it softened nicely with washing.

“Mixer” Accessories in Knit Picks

February 27

Mixer Trio3_KP

Fans of Knit Picks can now find my “Mixer” accessories in Swish Worsted. The yarn is delightful to work with, and comes in lots of great colors.

The patterns are available individually here: Mixer Hat, Mixer Mittens, and Mixer Scarf. The variety of knit/purl stitch patterns make these cute accessories entertaining to knit!

Stabilizing Seamless Sweaters, Part 3: Neck Edging

June 17

If you follow my blog, you’ll remember that I’m on a quest to put stability into the top-down seamless sweaters that I make. Too often, I’ve watched my beautiful sweaters grow droopy around the shoulders and ever-larger in the neck as time goes by.

As you may remember, I’ve been wanting to make the Tea Leaves Cardigan for forever. I’ve been working on a swatch to develop techniques I hope to carry forward into other top-down patterns as well.

In Part 1 of this series, I explained how I placed the cast-on edge a few rows down into the rows of garter in the beginning of the pattern. In Part 2 I showed how I added seams to the shoulders. Now in Part 3, I’ll explain how I finished the neck. (I’m using a contrasting color just to show you how I put this together – it’ll all be one color when I make the sweater.)

Fortunately, the beautiful Tea Leaves Cardigan pattern starts with several rows of garter stitch at the top, making it easy to hide a cast-on edge and subsequent picked up stitches into a knit row between two purl rows.



In 5 rows of garter, I used what would have been a right-side knit row (row 4) for my cast on edge (see the Part 1 post for details). Here you can see that I picked up stitches just above the garter row of purls (which is the last row – row 5 – of garter called for in the pattern). I learned (the hard way, of course) to be careful where I pick up the stitches. Because I’m adding rows from the bottom up, I need to pick up stitches into the right-side-up “V”s in the row below the cast on. Otherwise, the orientation of the added garter rows is wrong.






This means I can pick up stitches and then add the garter rows 1-3 back in, working it as I would a bottom-up sweater. By doing this, I have a super-stable neck that will not stretch out and that will support the weight of the sweater’s back. The result is nearly identical to what the sweater would look like if knitted from the top down as written, starting with 5 rows of garter:



Putting it all together

Here’s the game plan for my Tea Leaves Cardigan, then. The back of my swatch shows the modifications I’ll make to add stability to this top-down seamless sweater. First, I’ll work my cast on several rows lower than what the pattern calls for. Then to prevent the shoulders from stretching, I’ll insert seams along the shoulders. And finally, after the seams are done, I’ll add picked-up stitches to lend stability to the neck. Perhaps you’ll be inspired to try this on your next top-down seamless project yourself!


Ok…I’m off to start my Tea Leaves Cardigan now. I’ve been gazing longingly at my beautiful Tosh Vintage yarn, and can hardly wait to cast on!

Stabilizing Seamless Top-Down Sweaters, Part 2: Adding Shoulder Seams

June 11

In my first post about adding stability to a seamless top-down sweater, I described how I strengthened the neckline by casting on a couple of rows into the pattern, then picking up stitches and finishing the neckline as you would a typical seamed sweater. The picked up stitches prevent the neckline from stretching out.

Now that the neckline piece of the stability puzzle is solved, what about the shoulders? Without a seam to hold them in place, they tend to stretch out, making them look droopier the more times they’re worn. The challenge was to figure out how to incorporate a seam into a top-down seamless construction. I experimented with a swatch and came up with a technique that I think will work for the next sweater I’m going to make, the Tea Leaves Cardigan. I’ll add “seam” stitches right into the work, then seam them up using the mattress stitch.

The most difficult part of the whole experiment was figuring out where the seam should go. On the typical seamed sweater, half the stitches are allocated for the sweater’s front and half for the back. I couldn’t just divide the cast on stitches by two, since the Tea Leaves sweater has a button band which had to be taken into consideration. From the swatch I made on the smaller needles used for the button band, I know that the button band will be about 1″ wide. That translates to about 5 stitches. The size I’m going to make calls for casting on 96 stitches. Adding the 1″ (5 stitch equivalent) to the cast on, I get a 101 stitch equivalent, which I’ll round to 100 so it’s divisible by two. If this were a pieced pullover sweater, there would be 50 stitches in the back piece and 50 stitches in the front piece. But this being a cardi, I’ll leave out the button band stitch equivalent.  Going back to the cast on instructions, I’ll take the 96 cast on stitches and subtract the 50 stitches which will be allocated for the sweater’s back. This leaves 96-50 = 46 stitches for the front. Since this is a cardigan I’ll need to divide that 46 stitches by 2, leaving 23 stitches for each front.

Now I can figure out where to place the shoulder seams. I’ll work 23 front stitches, insert two stitches that will act as a seam, work 50 back stitches, insert 2 more stitches for the other shoulder seam, then finish with 23 stitches for the other side of the front. As for the length of my seam, I know that from my own neck to the point of my shoulder is about 4.5″. I see from the pattern’s photo that the neck is rather wide. So I’m going to estimate that seam should be about 2.5″-3″ in length. I can also look at the photo and see that there’s a garter area between the pattern’s stitch motif, so it might be good to end the seam just before the final stitch motif (in this case, some ruching).


Whew – with the math part out of the way, I can start the knitting. At this point, I only  have the cast on stitches on my needle (and in my first post I describe that the cast on is a few rows into the garter neck trim, so I can go back and pick up stitches later for added neck stability). I know I want to increase stitches by 2 for each seam, but I do not want to put the increases adjacent to each other or they’ll distort the fabric. I knit 22 stitches of the first front side, then increase 1 stitch using a M1. I place a marker for the seam. I knit 2 seam stitches and place a second seam marker. I increase again, then knit 48 of the back stitches. I work another increase (which brings the back stitch count back up to 50), then place a seam marker. I knit two seam stitches, then place another marker. I work another M1, and finish with the last 22 stitches of the second front. From here out, I’ll knit the seam stitches (between the markers) on the RS and purl them on the WS. When the seam is long enough, I use decreases to end the seam and get the stitch count back to normal.

Here’s how my swatch looks, with Step 1) add sts, Step 2) maintain seam sts for length of seam, Step 3) use decreases to get rid of seam sts prior to using mattress stitch to seam the seam sts:Seaming



Once the seam is long enough, I use the mattress stitch from the front of the work to seam the two seam stitches together. I weave under the bars between the seam stitches and the pattern’s regular knitting. (If I were seaming pieces instead, this would be the equivalent of weaving under the bars between the selvedge and the next stitch in.) Here’s what the seam looks like from the back when I’m done:

seam back

I used a different color yarn to illustrate the seaming on this swatch – for the sweater of course I’ll use the same color yarn as the rest of the sweater. Another detail is that I did not use the usual figure 8 at the bottom of the seam since I will be picking up neck stitches along that edge.  I’m pleased with this seam, since I can’t see it from the front side at all, yet it will add all the stability I want to the shoulder.

In Part 3 of this series, I’ll show you the last step for adding stability to the seamless top-down sweater: finishing the neck edge.



Stabilizing Seamless Top-Down Sweaters, Part 1: Casting On

June 3

I love knitting seamless top-down sweaters. But I don’t always love the way they wear over time. With no seams to support the neck and shoulders, they have a tendency to stretch and look droopy. Some people crochet an edging around the neck to add stability. There is also a way to crochet a chain along the inside of the shoulder, which can help.

I’ve had a different sort of experiment rattling around in my brain for a while now, and am finally getting the chance to put it into practice. I want to add a firm neckline and shoulder seams to my next top-down seamless sweater. The little bit of fiddling I’ll need to do will be worth it in the end, when the neck and shoulders of my sweater look good, wear after wear. No more sagging, I hope!

I hope that by following my blog posts about the process, you’ll get an idea of how to customize your favorite top-down seamless sweaters too. You’ll just need to adapt my technique for your particular pattern. So, let’s get started…

I’ve wanted to knit the beautiful Tea Leaves Cardigan for the longest time. This is not to imply that this particular pattern would sag or stretch – it’s just the right one for me to try my stability experiment on. The ruched stitch pattern on the yoke is fairly straight-forward, with no interruptions (like horizontal cables) to worry about, so adding shoulder seams should be no problem. Here’s a photo from the pattern:



Based on the pattern, I originally tried a swatch where I made little versions of a back and two fronts, then seamed them together. It dawned on me that while this worked great in a solid color, it would be a mess in the hand-dyed Madelinetosh I’ll be using; the colors would work up differently in each section.  That means I had to figure out how to build in shoulder seams that allow the yarn’s colors to flow along with as little interruption as possible.

Ultimately, I settled on a three-step process to add the stability I want. First, I cast on the neck several rows down in the pattern’s neck edging; second, I added two stitches at each shoulder which allowed me to create seams; third, I picked up stitches along my cast on and added the pattern’s neck edging back in. I’ll address each of these steps in separate blog posts, since the instructions are detailed.

The first quandary – Step One – is how to add stability to the neckline. Even though it isn’t a very firm cast-on, I’ll use the long tail method in anticipation of picking up stitches later. (Later in Step 3, I’ll be using picked-up stitches around the neck to add firmness to the neckline.) I need to work the cast-on into the neck edging in a way that stays true to the pattern, so it needs to start several rows down, then be finished as if it were a bottom-up sweater. Another way to look at it is this: Imagine a bottom-up construction; the neck is bound off and then the neck edging is added. In place of the bound off row is my cast on. It starts within the neck edging, like a bind-off would, and is then worked upward to finish the neck edging. I whipped up a little swatch that I hope will give an idea of how I planned the neck:


Fortunately the Tea Leaves Cardigan starts with several rows of garter stitch, so it’s easy to figure out where to place the cast-on. By placing the cast-on a few rows down into the garter edging on a knit row, it blends in beautifully. I can later come back and add the rest of the garter, just as I would on a bottom-up cardigan where the edging is added after the bind off. In this case, rows 1-5 are garter in the pattern, so I’m counting the cast on as row 4 (a right-side knit row). I’ll be able to add the three missing rows of garter back in later, by picking up neck edge stitches, so it will look exactly the same as the pattern.

The garter neck edging is an easy one to work the cast-on into. I’m sure I’ll have to work new swatches for other stitch patterns in order to work out the best placement for the cast-on/picked up stitches/neck edging.


For an excellent discussion on the value of seams, check out Sandi Rosner’s article in Twist Collective: “In Praise of Seams

Tea Leaves Cardigan pattern by Melissa LaBarre

Madelinetosh Tosh Vintage yarn



SLO Yarn Crawl is Almost Here

September 17

Five yarn shops in San Luis Obispo County have banded together to organize the very first SLO Yarn Crawl this weekend.   Here’s the skinny

When: Saturday September 21 and Sunday September 22 from 10AM to 5PM
Where: The 5 yarn shops in SLO County
Why: To have fun, and get to know your fiber neighbors!

How It Works tells about visiting the stores and entering to win prizes. Be sure to download the Passport from the Home page so you can get it stamped as you visit each store.

I’m thrilled to be participating in the Yarn Crawl. Ranch Dog Knitting will host the trunk show for my book Reversible Scarves: Curing the Wrong Side Blues. Have you ever wondered what all those scarves look like in person? I hope you’ll come by and check them out. Then, on Saturday the 21st, I’ll be signing books at Ranch Dog from 1:00 to 3:00. Stop by by for tea and a visit.

Reversible Scarves, trunk show, Ball & Skein & More, Cambria, kniting scarves

If you’re anywhere near the Central Coast this weekend, I hope you’ll attend!

AudKnits iButton

September 9

AudKnits iButton, icon, iPad, iPhone

I love being able to follow my blog from my iPad and iPhone, using a simple click of an icon. Did you know you can add a custom AudKnits button to the screen of your Apple device? My brilliant webmaster Alex created a bookmark that shows how to do it:

iButton Bookmark

Voila! I have easy access to my web site right from the screen. I hope that you’ll add the button to your Apple device too!
































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