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Itty Bitty Hat for Baby

January 22

  I loved making this baby hat from the very popular Poppy pattern, designed by Justine Turner and kindly offered for free on Ravelry. The great thing about this pattern is its versatility. It is written for several weights of yarn, and several sizes. I adore sport weight, so used some of my Lorna’s Laces Sportmate yarn in the Cranberry color. As this was a gift for a baby shower, I picked the 16″ size, figuring the baby will grow into it soon. The pattern was easy, clever, and lots of fun to make!

 baby hat

 

A little sunflower button was the just-right accent:

Poppy 3_sml

 

Resources:

Justine’s blog: Just Jussi

Poppy pattern: http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/poppy-11

Lorna’s Laces Sportmate: http://www.lornaslaces.net/sportmate.html

posted under Hats, Projects | 1 Comment »

Knit Picks IDP: Page Turner Throw

October 25

I’ve been snuggling up under my Page Turner Throw as the evenings turn cool. I think (and I admit I’m totally biased, here) it has the perfect combination of qualities – the worsted wool gives it warmth and a bit of heft, while the pattern lends a soft appearance.

This version of the pattern can be found in the Knit Picks Independent Designer Patterns.  It’s made of Wool of the Andes Worsted, which comes in 100 colors!

Knit Picks, IDP, Wool of the Andes, throw pattern

The throw is framed by icord, which reflects the cabling between the Calla lily motif.

I want to thank Knit Picks for including another of my patterns as part of their Independent Designer Partnership program!

Resources:

Knit Picks IDP Page Turner Throw

Wool of the Andes Worsted

Two New Patterns for Fall

September 24

My newest patterns explore texture.

hat, calbles, knitting, hat pattern, knitting pattern, twisted stitches, Debbie Bliss

knitting pattern, Quince & Co, Lark, throw pattern

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Featuring twisted stitches and winding cables, Emmalina provides plenty of variety to keep the knitting interesting. The pattern uses sport weight yarn, shown here in Debbie Bliss Cashmerino Baby.

 hat, knitting pattern, twisted stitches, cables, Debbie Bliss

Knitters will appreciate little details like cables that grow out of the ribbing, and the flower design formed by the crown’s clever decreases.

hat, knitting pattern, twisted stitches, cables, Debbie Bliss

 

hat, knitting pattern, twisted stitches, cables, Debbie Bliss

 

Emmalina Hat – $3.99

 

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Snuggling up in a hand-knit throw is one of the best things about winter. How do you like to use a throw? Maybe to wrap around your shoulders as you fumble for that first cup of coffee in the morning? Maybe as a lap robe while watching TV or posting something funny online? Me, I love books and use my Page Turner Throw to complete my favorite nesting spot where I cozy up to read. When winter wears out its welcome, the pretty calla lily motif is there to remind me that spring is not so far off.

 knitting pattern, throw, Quince & Co, Lark

The finished piece measures approximately 44″ x 54″, just right for warming a lap or pulling around the shoulders. The throw is worked across the width and finished with an attached I-cord border. The pattern calls for worsted weight, shown here in Quince & Co.‘s gorgeous Lark.

knitting pattern, throw, Quince & Co, Lark

Page Turner Throw – $4.99

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Do you love Knit Picks? Both Emmalina and Page Turner Throw are availble throught the Knit Picks Independent Designers Program, using Knit Picks yarns, of course! I’ll be blogging about these versions of the patterns in a future post, but in the meantime you can find them here

 Knit Picks, hat pattern, Independent Designers Program, Wool of the Andes

and here

Knit Picks, hat pattern, Independent Designers Program, Wool of the Andes

 

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Photos by Colleen Rosenthal and John Kieger

 

 

 

Fenimore

December 28

I love patterns that offer interesting construction. With its intriguing cables weaving in and out, Jared Flood’s Fenimore tam fits the bill nicely. I couldn’t wait to use the beautiful Brooklyn Tweed Shelter yarn calling to me from my stash.  Subtle flecks of color give the yarn depth without distracting from the texture of the cables.

 

I adore this yarn. It’s well behaved – easy to knit, and nicely spun. The heathered colors are so gorgeous – I can’t wait to make another project in another color!

I finished the tam just in time for the second snowfall of the season!

Jared’s written an amazing account of how he manufactures his yarns in historic Harrisville, New Hampshire. His posts are great, and illustrated with his beautiful photography.

posted under Hats, Projects, Yarn | 2 Comments »

Braided Cable Hat Comes Back

September 28

I’ve expanded upon my Braided Cable Hat pattern to include additional sizes, plus new instructions for using two colors. Now that it’s available in Small, Medium and Large, it makes for great fall and winter knitting for children, women and men. You can deck out your entire family!

The huge variety of colors available in worsted weight yarn makes this a good go-to pattern for gifts or to accessorize any outfit you might have in mind.

The simple cable, small amount of provisional cast-on and special knit/purl grafting technique make it a good project for trying methods that may be new to the less-experienced knitter. Line-by-line instructions make the grafting a breeze.

 

There are two easy ways to purchase this pattern for $1.99.

1. I’m grateful to Knit Picks for adding the Braided Cable Hat to their Independent Designer Program. There are lots of good things to say about ordering from Knit Picks. I used their terrific Swish Worsted Yarn for the pattern. It’s knits nicely, offers good stitch definition that makes the cabled braid stand out, is made of 100% superwash merino for easy care, and comes in dozens of tempting colors. The yarn is affordable, too!

 Knit Picks makes it so easy to make this hat – you have the option of buying a kit, which means that in one simple press of the button you can buy the pattern download plus the yarn colors shown in my photos. They also make it easy to buy your own colors, or even substitute one of their other worsted weight yarns. It’s all listed right there on the pattern page.  Or you can buy the pattern download alone. I love the flexibility Knit Picks offers. Brilliant!

2. If you’re logged into Ravelry, you can purchase the pattern from my AudKnits Store.

 I want to thank Susan Claudino, of Ravelry NoKnitSherlock fame, for knitting the hat samples for me. She went way above the call of duty, knitting her little fingers off in time for the photo shoot.

Braided Cable Hat – Ravelympics 2010

March 2

There’s nothing like a good challenge to spice up life! I had a blast (in panicky sort of way) participating in Ravelry’s knitting mayhem otherwise known as Ravelympics 2010. Thousands of knitters make projects with the idea of casting on during the Olympics’ opening ceremony and being done by the closing ceremony. Knitters can choose different events to “compete” in – hats, afghans, sweaters or dozens of other categories.

I, of course, had to choose the Designer Biathlon. I love the biathlon events in the real Olympics, and I love to design. But here was the challenge -  to cast on, design a project, write the pattern for it, photograph it, have it tech edited, and then publish it during the allotted time. Whew!

Here’s the result!

I chose Cascade 220 as the yarn, since it comes in so many great colors. The braided cable cuff is made first. I include instructions for grafting stitches together in pattern. When the hat is complete, the cuff is folded up. The circumference is about 20″, which will fit most women.

You may download the pattern for free here:

Beaumont Tam

January 5

I adored working on the Beaumont Tam. Here it is, all done:

This is  Jared Flood’s pattern from his delightful book Made in Brooklyn. Jared’s amazing eye for design made the fair isle a lot of fun to knit. As I went along I’d happily (ok, and somewhat enviously) marvel at his genius for design.

I used the Classic Elite yarn Fresco as called for in the pattern. I had only three colors available to choose from, so I ended up with the brown and yellow. The yarn’s lovely to work with – very soft. The slight fuzziness caused some consternation when my hubbie took the photographs – he thought his pictures were out of focus. (The poor guy – he’s valiant for making forays into the yarn world.)

posted under Hats | 4 Comments »

Brooklyn Tweed Projects

December 1

Toward the end of November I found myself  home in California (finally!) long enough to take two classes from Jared Flood, also known in the knitting community as Brooklyn Tweed. Besides Thanksgiving, Jared was one of the reasons I came back from Ohio at all. (Don’t tell him that – he’ll think I’m stalking him or something.) Jared was hosted by the fabulous Santa Barbara yarn and tea shop called Loop & Leaf.

The first class I took included  colorwork instruction using the Beaumont Tam/Beanie as the project. This is a lovely stranded pattern from Jared’s book Made in Brooklyn. Using Classic Elite’s Fresco, it has a slightly fuzzy look thanks to the yarn’s bit-of-angora mix. All I can say is that I feel like “AudKnits, Home of the Wonky Stitches” every time I knit stranded patterns. Including my own. I have to have faith that blocking will work its usual magic on my tam. Despite this photo’s depiction, the hat pattern is gorgeous – you can check it out in the book or among the projects on Ravelry.

Beaumont-Cropped-2

The second class was based on Jared’s pattern Girasole. Described as “A traditional lace shawl”, the pattern is stunning and can be made up as a blanket, rather than a shawl, by using worsted yarn. I’m trying it in Cascade Pastaza. Jared explained that the llama content in Pastaza will make this a heavy blanket. (Sounds just right for Ohio winters.)  I’m making it in a rust color I never would have chosen except for a certain friend who (correctly) chastised me for being so predictable in always going for greens and blues. So there.

The coolest technique I learned in the Girasole class was the circular center cast on for Girasole. That and the various ways to put a lifeline into the work.

Girasole-Beginning-2

This thing is going to be huge when it grows up! It looks square now just because it hasn’t graduated to circular needles yet. Do you think I should aim for the next World Series as a completion date? Knitting blankets while my husband watches baseball seems to be a tradition now.

Koolhaas Hat

March 18

As I knitted Jared Flood’s Koolhaas Hat I wanted to break out into all sorts of Discovery Channel-like descriptions…”A Marvel of Modern Engineering”… “Structural Design at its Best”…

One of my favorite things about making Koolhaas was getting to the top. As I arrived at the decreases that shape the top of the hat, it started to dawn on my how brilliant Jared’s design is.

 

If you’d like to read Jared’s fascinating post about how his Koolhaas design evolved, you can find it here.

posted under Hats, Projects | 7 Comments »

Kool Hat Workshop

January 22

Taking Jared Flood (brooklyntweed) ‘s workshop on his wonderful KoolHaas Hat pattern reminded me a little bit of summer camp. I remember as a kid being all excited about learning some new craft – making popsicle stick recipe holders or plastic lanyards.

Fast forward, er, a bunch of years. Here we were, eagerly sitting around tables with our materials in front of us – in the grownup version it was yarn and needles – being taught the basics of travelling stitches. Jared showed us how to work his cables without a cable needle. It’s awkward at first, and I think I untwisted some of the twisted stitches when I couldn’t hang onto them. But it’s much faster than having to use the cable needle for every twisted stitch all the way around the hat. Jared is a terrific teacher – he is enthusiastic and explains things well.

I’ve been busy doing some other projects, like the never-ending Make It Mitered Afgan. So here’s the Koolhaas Hat so far.

If you’re interested in seeing how to make cables without a cable needle, and you don’t happen to have Jared handy to show you (boo-hoo), you might like to check out Episode 15 of Let’s Knit2gether.

posted under Hats, Projects | 1 Comment »
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